A Case of Refractory Hemorrhagic Cystitis in which Bleeding Control was Finally Achieved by Cystectomy.

A 60-year-old man presented at our hospital with gross hematuria. He had been treated for nephrotic syndrome with cyclophosphamide and steroids since he was in his 20s. We detected diffuse hemorrhagic cystitis on cystoscopy and diagnosed him with cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. He was hospitalized due to clot retention. We treated him with blood transfusion for severe anemia and conducted continuous bladder irrigation. We performed hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transurethral electric coagulation, and increased the steroid dose. However, we could not control the hematuria. Finally, we performed cystectomy, and he is now well without hematuria. Although cystectomy is the final option, it is important to decide it in a timely manner because a delay decreases the quality of life.

Hemorrhagic Cystitis: Treatment With Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a rare treatment modality for hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) following BK virus reactivation in the immunosuppressed population. Clinicians need to be aware of the etiology, preventive measures, complications, and various management techniques in HC while treating patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. This study details the pathologic progression of HC in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia harboring BK virus after cytotoxic induction chemotherapy and haploidentical marrow transplantation. A search of PubMed for literature published from 1973-2018 was conducted using keywords.

Overcoming tumor hypoxia as a barrier to radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment.

Hypoxia exists to some degree in most solid tumors due to inadequate oxygen delivery of the abnormal vasculature which cannot meet the demands of the rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The levels of oxygenation within the same tumor are highly variable from one area to another and can change over time. Tumor hypoxia is an important impediment to effective cancer therapy. In radiotherapy, the primary mechanism is the creation of reactive oxygen species; hypoxic tumors are therefore radiation resistant. A number of chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to be less effective when exposed to a hypoxic environment which can lead to further disease progression.

Long-term outcomes of interventions for radiation-induced xerostomia: A review.

Xerostomia, or dry mouth, is a significant problem affecting quality of life in patients treated with radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Strategies for reduction of xerostomia burden vary widely, with options including: sialagogue medications, saliva substitutes, acupuncture, vitamins, hyperbaric oxygen, submandibular gland transfer, and acupuncture or associated treatments. In this review, we sought to evaluate long-term outcomes of patients treated with various interventions for radiation-induced xerostomia. A literature search was performed using the terms “xerostomia” and “radiation” or “radiotherapy”; all prospective clinical trials were evaluated, and only studies that reported 1 year follow up were included.

The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Chronic Radiation Proctitis.

The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) is dedicated to ensuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and management of disorders and diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus. The Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee is charged with leading international efforts in defining quality care for conditions related to the colon, rectum, and anus by developing clinical practice guidelines based on the best available evidence. These guidelines are inclusive, not prescriptive, and are intended for the use of all practitioners, healthcare workers, and patients who desire information about the management of the conditions addressed by the topics covered in these guidelines. Their purpose is to provide information on which decisions can be made rather than to dictate a specific form of treatment.

Further application of hyperbaric oxygen in prostate cancer.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment for multiple pathological states, which involves hypoxic conditions. Over the past 50 years, HBOT has been recommended and used in a wide variety of medical conditions, clinically in the treatment of ischemic or nonhealing wounds and radiation-injured tissue, and in the treatment of malignancy. The mechanism of this treatment is providing oxygen under pressure which is higher than the atmosphere thus increasing tissue oxygen concentration. When cells get enough oxygen in the microenvironment, they become active and replicate effectively. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death among male around the world.